MvBarracuda:Favourite RPG mechanics

From Post-Apocalyptic RPG wiki

Jump to: navigation, search

Deprecated mechanic.png This article covers a deprecated game mechanic.

There are two main reasons why game mechanics become deprecated. They either have been fleshed out in more detail and became a full fledged proposal this way. Or they have been rejected in favour of other proposals and have been abandoned. Either way: deprecated game mechanics are no longer utilized by the mechanics department at this point.


This article is a compiled list of RPG mechanics that I personally liked. That does NOT mean that these kind of mechanics have to be featured in PARPG but it should serve as a source of inspiration and as basis for further mechanics discussion.

Combat

Example

Fallout 1/2.

Rationale

Fallout provided a nice mix between common RPG combat and mechanics from turn-based strategy games:

  • Action-point system. You had the choice to do a number of things with your points:
    • Activate objects that you have in your hands.
    • Open the inventory.
    • Reload.
    • Shoot / throw / swing / all kinds of hand to hand attacks.
    • Target specific bosy parts and shoot at them.
  • Importance of positioning of your PC and NPCs. Taking cover behind walls and other barriers.
  • No ducking or reclining. This would have increased the number of needed animations to a large extend.
  • Shooting through open doors and windows.

Day night cycle

Example

Arcanum.

Rationale

Day night cycle in Arcanum was pretty nice from a bunch of different point of views.

From a visual point of view the day night cycle in Arcanum simply looked pretty nice:

As all NPCs had daytime-dependent schedules, day night cycle influened the game mechanics as well. You could only steal from shops when the owner was sleeping. The inventory of shops was stored in locked containers that you had to pick. You needed good sneaking and lockpicking skills to actually succeed in this undertaking.

Encounters

Example #1

Fallout.

Rationale

When it comes to encounters there are different aspects to take into account:

  • Where does the encounter happen: predefined or random location?
  • What happens: predefined or random event?
  • Chance: does it always happen or is this only a chance that the even takes place?

Example #2

Realms of Arkania 1.

Rationale

ROA featured (semi-)predefined encounters:

  • They happened at predefined locations.
  • They featured predfined specific events.
  • They did not always happen. For the majority of them you would need to pass a certain awareness roll to find them.

Inventory

Example

Realms of Arkania series.

Rationale

The inventory in Realms of Arkania was pretty realistic. It was limited by weight and size restrictions. Every PC (you could have up to 6 PCs in your party + 1 NPC) had about 2 dozen of item slots. Furthermore weight limit depended on PC's strength. Smaller items (herbs, food, candy) were stackable. Due the pretty harsh size and weight restrictions you could only carry very few items. If you were overloaded your action points were reduced until you couldn't move anymore in combat. There was a maximum limit that you could not exceed as the game refused to add more items to the inventory of the overloaded character.

Journal

Example

Arcanum.

Rationale

Arcanum features the best quest log in an RPG that I've played. The log is rather well structured and all logged text is ordered by date and grouped:

  • Rumours & notes: all kind of general notes that can't be categorized otherwhise.
  • Quests: list of quests. Colour-coded:
    • Blue: accepted.
    • Green: completed.
    • Red: failed / rejected.
  • Reputations: special reputations you earned in the course of the game.
  • Blessings & curses: magical modifications of your stats.
  • Kills & injuries: list of killed enemies (grouped in categories) and suffered injuries. Injuries that have been dealt with are crossed out.
  • Background: the background that you've chosen at the beginning of the game.
  • Key ring contents: list of all keys that are part of your keyring.

Save games

Example

Arcanum.

Rationale

Arcanum featured some nice savegame-related aspects:

  • Autosave functionality.
  • Deletion of saved games was part of the savegame interface.
  • Quicksave slot.
  • Screenshot of moment when the game was saved.
  • Unlimited number of savegames.

For PARPG some additional features would be nice:

  • More than one quicksave slot to avoid overwriting savegames by accident.

World map

Example

Arcanum / Fallout.

Rationale

The world map in both games was nice both from a visual as an mechanics point of view.

Mechanics

  • Non-linearity (go whereever you want).
  • Fog of war (exploration).
  • Random encounters (surprise!).
Personal tools